If you’ve ever had to say goodbye to one of your most loved pieces of furniture, whether it be because of a stain, scratch, or natural wear and tear, then listen up…here are loads of easy ways you can bring your piece back to life, looking as beautiful as ever!

Old furniture often gets left behind when it comes to revamping or even moving homes. It could be the vintage bookshelf your great granny left you a few years ago or a mirror you picked up at a car boot fair…. It’s stuff like this that often gets thrown away, even though (after a little TLC) it could be the finishing touch your home needs.

From stripping and staining to whitewashing, revamping your old furniture doesn’t have to be difficult. Take your old coffee table, for example, if, god forbid, you spot a scratch on that beautiful oak or pine, then your first instinct is to paint over the mark as soon as you can. Staining the furniture rather than painting the wood will still show off the wood grain, plus give it a lovely rustic finish. Gather together some sandpaper, wood conditioner, wood stain and polyurethane varnish.

Whitewashing is everywhere – celebrity homes, the latest issue of Architecture Digest and now in your house! Achieving this faded whitewash look is a lot simpler than you think, all you need is some sandpaper, liming wax, soft rags and clear wax.

Finding the perfect antique piece is a real treat for anyone. However, you may not be a fan of the original material. Before you turn away and leave that 1800’s chair you know deep down you want, consider reupholstery. Now, although this takes some learning and some DIY skills, the results are way beyond worth it. Just remember to take photos at every step as you recover your dining chairs so you can see the stunning transformation.

Unlike reupholstering a full item of furniture, recovering a seat cushion is quite a straightforward and satisfying task. All you need for this job is a stapler, new fabric and some foam – easy as pie.

Milk paint, the most natural paint money can buy, yes it’s actually made with milk, comes in a powder form where you mix up the paint yourself. It’s also non-toxic, which is a bonus, and is available in a wide range of customisable colours ready to use on finished or unfinished wood.

Not just used to graffiti, spray paint works wonders on outdoor furniture, especially when all you need is the paint, rubber gloves and a drop cloth! Bear in mind you’ll need to thoroughly clean the furniture, making sure to scrub off all scuffs and rust before applying your coat of paint.

Stripping old painted finishes isn’t an easy task, and isn’t recommended for those with respiratory problems. Aside from that, stripping your old furniture yourself can save you lots of money and can produce some good results!

Have you done any DIY decorating lately, which method worked best for you?